English Language

Determiners

2018-02-02 14:03 #0 by: Evelina

"An important role in English grammar is played by determiners – words or phrases that precede a noun or noun phrase and serve to express its reference in the context. The most common of these are the definite and indefinite articles, the and a(n). " - Wiki

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2018-02-02 14:52 #1 by: Emo

Very interesting. I like the way it was presented.

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2018-02-02 14:53 #2 by: Evelina

I find these types of videos really helpful. Glad

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2018-02-03 12:01 #3 by: Emo

How do you read these three sentences:

I too look forward to read about the book.

I too look forward to read about this book.

I too look forward to read about that book.

How do you feel about them?

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2018-02-03 12:40 #4 by: Evelina

If you are referring to the post about the book, Fire and Fury, then I would say it with the word "this", since our discussion revolves around a single book and everyone reading can see a photo of it. 

You can say (British English uses less commas):

I too look forward to reading about this book. 

Or, you can say (American English loves commas):

I, too, look forward to reading about this book. 

If someone else, for example, comments  on the same post and says; "Oh, have you heard about another similar book called Trump and His Hair? I want to read it." 

Then it would be more appropriate to say: "I too want to read that book". Since we don't have this newly introduced book in front of us, so to speak. 

This sentence, "I too look forward to read(ing) the book", is also appropriate but just less specific about which book you want to read. 

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2018-02-03 12:49 #5 by: Emo

I thought I had three different ways with different feelings. It is always harder to express in writing than in spoken language, That is way I wanted to be aware of how people read those three examples.

 Can you tell me about your examples what feeling each of them expresses.

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2018-02-03 12:54 #6 by: Evelina

Hm, I am not really sure about the feeling. For me, the feeling is the same with all of them. However, this, that and the, are ways to specify which book you are talking about. 

This: refers to the book that is right in front of us

That: refers to the book that is not visually in front of us

The: refers more generally about a book

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2018-02-03 13:03 #7 by: Emo

#6 Thank you.
Then there was a difference even if it was another than i thought. Laughing

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2018-02-03 13:04 #8 by: Evelina

I hope I helped and didn't make you confused!Scared

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2018-02-03 14:39 #9 by: Emo

Confused? I? ThinkingConfusedDizzy Of course not.Laughing out loud

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2018-02-03 19:19 #10 by: Leia

Emojis have been a great addition to understand feeling in someone's writing, it can be a tricky one.

All the best, Leia

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2018-02-04 04:45 #11 by: Emo

I find them very useful. It is a way to make jokes and show it isn't seriouly written.
When sombody writes something you like, many people just click Like, but if some of them instead make a Glad or a Laughingit shows better that it is read and liked (and the site gets more activitypoints  Idea).
#10 Can you give any examples when they are tricky, (expect when people don't want to read a joke as a joke).

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